Deleted emails bring new political scandal

Reprieve from news of political wrongdoing short-lived courtesy of BC Liberals.

With the federal election done and over, it would have been nice to have received a bit of a break, a breath of air not tainted by news of political wrongdoing and/or scandal.

No such luck here in B.C., where residents are currently receiving an education on the process of “triple deleting” emails and the ramifications this has when done by those in power who at one point, offered some semblance of promise to be more transparent.

The gist of the story is how the B.C. government, particularly staff in the Ministry of Transportation,

thoroughly deleted their email history related to the infamous “Highway of Tears.” This is a stretch of Highway 16 between Prince George and Prince Rupert, from which 19 women are reported to have disappeared between 1969 and 2011. Thirteen of those women were found to have been murdered. One of the homicides has been directly linked through DNA to serial killer Bobby Jack Fowler, and Fowler is suspected to have had a hand in two of the other murders.

Fowler, however, was arrested in 1995 and died in prison in 2006. And, since four of the disappearances and one of the homicides occurred in that time period, the RCMP’s investigation continues.

As for the significance of the deleted emails, while there is no longer a record of their contents, their deletion constitutes a violation of B.C.’s Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. Privacy Commissioner Elizabeth Denham has also asked police to investigate a former ministry assistant for allegedly lying under oath after deleting emails related to an information request pertaining to the Highway of Tears.

In response, Transportation minister Todd Stone nonchalantly admitted to having triple deleted his own emails from time to time, noting that is “how all British Columbians manage their email.”

Of course, most British Columbians aren’t paid by the taxpayer to serve the province.

Premier Christy Clark has ordered all political staff and cabinet ministers to save all emails, pending the completion of a review of problems relating to freedom of information.

It has since been revealed that two political staffers in Clark’s office, chief-of-staff Dan Doyle and communications director Ben Chin may also have been covering their tracks, leaving no official record of communications during certain time periods.

Meanwhile, British Columbians wait to see if and when Prime Minister designate Justin Trudeau comes through with a promise to launch an inquiry into the deaths and disappearances of aboriginal women from Highway 16.

 

Just Posted

New hotel planned for Salmon Arm

Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott to build, applying for rezoning with city

Brewers create anti-fascist ale

Not For Nazis Nut Brown Ale will be ready in time for Christmas

Traci Genereaux remembered at Vernon vigil

Family and friends remember Genereaux as a “fiery red-head with the best sense of humour”

Angler fined for over-fishing on Gardom Lake

It was an expensive fishing trip for an Okanagan man this weekend.… Continue reading

Shock hits Okanagan flagging company

Experienced employee battling serious injuries after being hit by a car

Tattooing couple opens new shop in Lake Country

Cody and Fabiana Philpott opened NSI Tattoo in August

David Cassidy, teen idol and ‘Partridge Family’ star, dies at 67

Cassidy announced earlier this year he had been diagnosed with dementia

Minimal increase in city budget

Salmon Arm taxpayers to pay 1.5 per cent increase in 2018 taxes.

Piano power recognized

Several Shuswap music students scale conservatory heights

Locals excited for national special olympics

Bocce and basketball athletes to represent the Shuswap in Nova Scotia

Band strikes a Christmas note

Community concert takes place Dec. 9 at the Nexus in Salmon Arm

Author faces and triumphs over abuse

Book intended to inspire women who suffer from any form of abusive behaviour

Summerland business provides cannabidiol products

Products contain medical benefits of cannabis, but with no psychoactive properties

LETTER: Jumbo Valley is part of Ktunaxa territorial claim

Ktunaxa Nation Council responds to Tom Fletcher column

Most Read