Fight invasive species with the Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society

AGM coming up Sept. 25 in Sicamous

Knotweed before and after treatment. (Submitted)

Concern for and treatment of invasive plants in the Columbia Shuswap region is increasing.

Municipalities, government ministries, stewardship groups, and individuals are all working together to treat invasive plants in many locations around the region, said a news release from the Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society.

Dollars, time and effort are spent on removing these problem plants, but left in the wake of all this effort we sometimes see bare ground – an open invitation for new invasive plants to arrive.

The soceity is addressing this issue with a special workshop focused on the rehabilitation of sites treated for invasive plants.

The workshop will focus on several key questions that need to be addressed to each site: will native vegetation just come back on it’s own; what can we do to help it along; what species to use if reseeding is required, where to get seeds, and what adaptations do we need to make in our management of the site.

The workshop will be hosted by the society with presenter Barb Stewart of Boundary Invasive Species Society, an expert in this field with over 20 years of experience.

This workshop is available to land managers and interested members of the public, and will foster long term management of our environment.

The workshop will be held before the society’s Annual General Meeting on the morning of Sept. 25, at the Sicamous District Chambers at 446 Main Street, Sicamous. The workshop runs from 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., with the CSISS AGM from 12:30 – 1:30pm on the same day.

To register, please fill out this online form: https://goo.gl/forms/Sg37yrPj0w8TQpTV2 If you have questions, please email: info@columbiashuswapinvasives.org

The Columbia Shuswap Invasive Species Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the prevention, management, and reduction of invasive species in the Columbia Shuswap Regional District. CSISS is thankful for the generous support of the Shuswap Watershed Council, Columbia Basin Trust, the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, and the Province of British Columbia.

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