Serena Caner, registered dietician

Healthy bites: Managing Thanksgiving leftovers

By Serena Caner

Post-Thanksgiving is a time when many of must come to terms with our grocery habits.

The 20-kilogram turkey seemed like a good idea, until we realize we will be eating turkey until Christmas.

The mashed potatoes and stuffing were delicious but half our guests no longer eat carbs.

Finding space for these amongst our other leftovers, the forgotten-now-moldy-head-of-lettuce and our collection of condiments we’ve only used once, is tricky.

Barely able to close the fridge door, we suddenly hope for that a hungry hockey team will show up to clean out the saran-wrapped-aluminum-foiled-tupperware mess that has become our fridge.

The average Canadian household throws away about $1,500 of food per year.

In Canada, $31 billion of food ends up in landfills or composters each year, according to a 2014 report from Value Chain Management International.

Many of us could do a better job of managing our own food waste. Besides the obvious answer of not overbuying, food wastage can be minimized by knowing a few things about your fridge:

The coldest area of your fridge is the bottom shelf. This is where you should store highly perishable items such as meat and dairy.

The drawers at the bottom of your fridge are low-humidity. This will extend the life of most fruits and vegetables.

The fridge door is the warmest area- put condiments and more shelf-stable items here (not dairy).

People are most likely to eat foods placed at the front of the top two shelves. Put leftovers that need to be eaten here.

The best-before date is not an indicator of food safety, but refers to the freshness of an unopened product.

You can buy and eat foods after the best-before date has passed; however, the food may have lost some of its freshness, flavour, or texture.

This means unopened dairy past its best before date may not have gone bad, so test before you toss.

(I use the highly scientific eye-nose test. Is there visible mould? Does it smell off?)

Do not store bread or wine on top of your fridge.

This area is very warm and may speed up the spoilage of food products.

-Serena Caner is a registered dietitian who works at Shuswap Lake General Hospital.

Just Posted

Iconic Shuswap sternwheeler undergoing work for return to service

Sicamous business owner Mike Helfrick hopes to offer dinner tours on historic vessel

CSRD board approves pay increase for directors

Remuneration bylaw will come into effect after election of new board

CSRD looking into upgrades for Scotch Creek Water Plan

District beginning feasibility study for future upgrades

Race is on for Shuswap late-run sockeye salmon

New estimates say about 750,000 sockeye will spawn on the Adams River, similar to 2014 dominant run

Salmon Arm library to undergo upgrades over the winter

New meeting space planned for Okanagan Regional Library’s Salmon Arm branch

Conservation officer frees B.C. deer from flotation gear mishap

BC Conservation Officer Service is reminding residents to keep backyards clear of entanglements

VIDEO: B.C.-born firefighter remembered by MP in emotional speech

Family asks first responders to look after one another in wake of suicide, growing concerns of PTSD

Airline has ‘close call’ with drone while en route to B.C. airport

Jazz Aviation reported the drone sighting near Vancouver to the RCMP and Transport Canada

Tragic accident claims life of B.C. toddler

Fundraising effort has been created to help mom and family

B.C. nanny charged with sex abuse of 3 children

Saanich Police seek potential victims of Johnathon Lee Robichaud from Central Saanich

‘I’m no quitter’ on climate change issues, McKenna says at G7 ministers meeting

David Suzuki says if McKenna believes what she’s saying, she too should quit

VIDEO: Inside an eerily empty mall in Canada

Only nine of 517 retail spaces are open for business as the grand opening postponed to next year

B.C. wildfires burned large areas affected by mountain pine beetles: Experts

The mountain pine beetle epidemic affected more than 180,000 square kilometres in B.C.

Tens of thousands without power following tornado in Ottawa region

Hydro Ottawa says more than 170,000 customers were without power early this morning

Most Read