Free session to explore genetics of Alzheimer’s

Okanagan Clinical Trials is hosting a free community event at the Okanagan College Theatre.

  • May. 9, 2018 11:30 a.m.

Members of the community are invited to attend a free information session on the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease with a special guest speaker, Josh Dueck, Paralympian.

Okanagan Clinical Trials, a medical research company located in Kelowna, is hosting this free community event that will take place at the Okanagan College Theatre in Kelowna on May 23 at 7 p.m.

Josh Dueck is a Canadian alpine skier. He won a silver medal at the 2010 Winter Paralympics in the men’s slalom sit-ski event. On Feb. 3, 2012, Josh became the first person to perform a backflip on snow in a sit-ski. His raw approach to sharing stories is refreshing and takes you through the natural cadence of life, exploring the peaks and valleys of the human experience. His incredible success in the sport has inspired him to explore the depth of his own humanity, which he shares with grace and humility. His candid observations will have you on the edge of your seat and the cusp of tears.

Dr. Christie is the Director of Research at Okanagan Clinical Trials; she has extensive knowledge of neurological diseases, specializing in Alzheimer’s disease. She obtained both her Masters and Doctoral degrees in Neuroscience from the University of Calgary and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Melbourne. She has published multiple scientific papers in high impact journals and conveys a deep understanding of the brain and peripheral nervous system.

Okanagan Clinical Trials would like to help raise awareness about Alzheimer’s disease and the genetic risks. Join us for this unique opportunity to both relate and learn about a subject matter that is often-times complex and daunting. “Currently there are no treatments to prevent Alzheimer’s disease,” said Dr. Kim Christie. “Medications focused on the genetic risk would be a huge advancement in the prevention and treatment of the disease. If effective this would offer great hope to families devastated by Alzheimer’s.”

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and affects almost 30 million people worldwide. It is a progressive condition with no cure.

Typically, it begins by affecting an individual’s short-term memory. It worsens over time and eventually leads to death. Most often, Alzheimer’s affects people over the age of 65, but some develop early-onset Alzheimer’s much earlier in life. Individuals interested in attending this free event should call Okanagan Clinical Trials and ask for Patti to reserve their seat.

Alternatively, individuals can visit our website at www.oktrials.ca and click the event link on our home page to reserve tickets. Please note that seating is limited and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

Okanagan Clinical Trials can be reached at 250-862-8141.

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