Sicamous waste collection in CSRD’s sights

Recyclable and compostable waste filling Sicamous landfill.

When the Columbia Shuswap Regional District reviews its waste management plan next year, the results of a recent waste audit at the Sicamous landfill will be up for discussion.

The results of a Tri Environmental Consulting Inc. waste audit completed at the landfill between Sept. 7 and 9 revealed that about 70 per cent of the material going into the landfill, which serves some 3,500 residents could be recycled.

A total of 10 waste samples, each weighing approximately 100 kilograms were collected and analyzed.

Each sample was classified according to one of the following sources – residential curb side program, residential self-haul, industrial, commercial and institutional or from transfer stations.

All Samples were then sorted into 12 primary categories, 46 secondary categories and 59 tertiary categories.

Analysis of the overall waste composition entering the Sicamous landfill revealed that 35.7 per cent is compostable organics – including yard and garden waste, food scraps and clean wood.

Plastic and paper were the second and third largest categories at 16.9 per cent each. Glass and metals contributed six per cent and 5.1 per cent respectively.

The greatest quantity came from the residential self-haul sector where 3.4 per cent of the total mass was electronic waste – three times more than the residential curb side sector, which in Sicamous, is subscription based.

Most of the electronic items found in the audit are included in various recycling programs in B.C., including computers, audio equipment, small appliances, power tools and lighting equipment.

Small household batteries, oil containers and paint thinners, which are also recyclable in this province, accounted for 1.5 per cent.

CSRD waste management co-ordinator Ben Van Nostrand notes there is a slight (“and slight is being generous”) increase in the percentage of recyclables entering the Sicamous landfill compared to other landfills in the regional district.

“Maybe people are doing the right thing by taking it to the depot, which costs way more than a curbside program,” he says.

Van Nostrand points out that because the District of Sicamous turned down a curb side recycling program in 2011, they are too late for the cost-saving Materials Management BC program that will be implemented across the regional district next year.

“They were the only municipality not to get on-board with what was in the waste management plan,” he says. “We have said we’ll run the depots, but there will be changes. It won’t be like the big green bin.”

However, Van Nostrand says that those who now pay for private curb side pick-up service will see no changes.

CSRD staff made a presentation to Sicamous’ committee of a whole meeting Oct. 9, explaining the MMBC program, why Sicamous isn’t in and how they could get in by implementing a curb side program over the next couple of years.

 

“You had to have a plan in place in 2012 in order to get on. But  MMBC will review the program within a couple of years, at which point they may say whoever has a curb side plan now may be included in the program that will give them the financial incentives,” Van Nostrand says.

 

 

Just Posted

CSRD to seek voter approval to borrow for $2 million for park land

Regional district advances plans to purchase Centennial Field for $2.75 million

Mudslides expected to keep Seymour Arm road closed for at least three days

Alternate route Celista-Blueberry Forest Service Road, accessible by four-by-four vehicles.

Bold, brave and intriguing theatre lined up for Edge festival

Theatre on the Edge showcases local and visiting talent at Shuswap Theatre

Disaster relief: four tips for coping with wildfires, smoky skies

Being shrouded in smoke or having to flee from wildfires can cause anxiety, stress, depression

Help needed on restoration of historical cabin in the Shuswap

The Cache Cabin served as the halfway point on the journey to the Mara Lookout Ranger Station.

Video shows fireworks shot at swan in Alberta

Alberta Fish and Wildlife is investigating the incident in Grande Prairie

Okanagan bylaw officer best in B.C.

Al Harrison of Vernon named Bylaw Officer of the Year at annual association conference

Man accused of assault at South Okanagan beach gets bail

Thomas Brayden Kruger-Allen was granted bail at the Penticton provincial courthouse on Monday

Surrey RCMP raises Pride flag amid din of protesters

There were about 30 protesters on either side, and 20 Mounties doing crowd control

‘Text neck’ causing bone spurs to grow from millennials’ skulls, researchers say

Technology use from early childhood causing abnormal bone growths in 41 per cent of young adults

B.C. teen killed by fallen tree on field trip remembered as hero

13-year-old Tai Caverhill was the first to spot the tree falling and warned his friends

Our history in pictures

Bedford’s Pharmacy at the west corner of Alexander Avenue and Front Street… Continue reading

Should B.C. get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

The province wants to know, as state governments down south make the move

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Most Read