Salmon Arm Coun. Louise Wallace Richmond, co-chair with Coun. Debbie Cannon of the April 27 to 29 convention of SILGA, the Southern Interior Local Government Association, introduces members of a panel who presented at the conference. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)

Salmon Arm Coun. Louise Wallace Richmond, co-chair with Coun. Debbie Cannon of the April 27 to 29 convention of SILGA, the Southern Interior Local Government Association, introduces members of a panel who presented at the conference. (Martha Wickett-Salmon Arm Observer)

VIDEO: Floods, fires, food demand attention in Salmon Arm as politicians meet

150 regional representatives from Southern Interior compare notes, strategies

The delegates have come and gone, but the benefits of getting together promise to linger.

Salmon Arm hosted about 150 delegates to the SILGA (Southern Interior Local Government Association) Convention from April 27 to 29, the first time since 2019 political representatives of the region’s municipalities and regional districts have been together.

Judging from the atmosphere in the convention rooms at the Prestige Harbourfront Resort, along with some cursory surveys of delegates, it appeared they were appreciating the boost from getting together and conversing about their shared issues and responsibilities.

Salmon Arm Coun. Louise Wallace-Richmond is a director on the SILGA board so was a member of the convention committee. Knowing how much work there would be as the host community, she asked that Coun. Debbie Cannon be appointed to the committee and they acted as co-chairs.

“We were mindful that it would likely be our first gathering since the pandemic and wanted to choose topics and panels that would really reflect what we’ve all been through these last two years. Certainly climate change, the reconciliation piece and economic recovery were top of mind. So was food security and forestry. On top of all of that of course is the ongoing housing crisis,” said Wallace-Richmond following the conference.

Read more: ‘You’re going to start getting hungry’ if Southern Interior food producers aren’t supported

Read more: ‘Spot on brain’ story helps urge Southern Interior leaders to promote healing



martha.wickett@saobserver.net
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