Chrissy Deye, Heather Janzen and Monica Kriese serve a person who stopped by for the outdoor free lunch on Friday, Oct. 30. (File photo)

Chrissy Deye, Heather Janzen and Monica Kriese serve a person who stopped by for the outdoor free lunch on Friday, Oct. 30. (File photo)

Year in Review: The Shuswap Market looks back at headlines from February 2021

  • Dec. 31, 2021 7:00 p.m.

• A month or so ago, Lance Ewan picked up a lost glove and a new habit. While he was out on walks with his well-loved Yorkie/Maltese-cross Suki, he regularly spotted single gloves or mittens lying on the ground. Instead of leaving them lie, he began picking them up with a plastic bag and taking them to his neighbour’s place. There, just for a joke, he placed them over the little points atop the wroughtiron fence. When neighbour Eddie Turner noticed their arrival, he laughed and approved. “They looked rather nice,” Turner smiled. “It’s amazing how many people lose a glove.” Since then, the abandoned accessories have multiplied. “After a while I stopped counting. I get mixed up after 18,” Turner joked.

• The temperature hovered between -5 C and -10 C, fortifying an icy wind as people sat around propane fire pits, behind the protection of tarps, eating a tasty lunch. This was a meal served on Feb. 8 in the parking lot behind the Crossroads Free Methodist Church and near the School District 83 administration building in Salmon Arm.

Lunch organizers Chrissy Deye and Monica Kriese said numbers had been going up and people are really appreciative of a hot nutritious meal. Lieutenant Joel Torrens, with the Salvation Army, said the shelter at McGuire Lake was hovering around 20 to 25 people per night, but has capacity for more.

• Repeated vandalism targeting Mary Stewart’s public anti-racist message has only made her more determined. Last summer, the 70-old resident of Scotch Creek began posting signs supportive of the Black Lives Matter movement at the end of her property along Squilax-Anglemont Road.

Every sign she posted, 22 in total, was torn down, most damaged in the process. “Several people thought I should be really careful and maybe I should stop putting the signs up, but I just couldn’t not do it,” said Stewart. “I just feel that racists… they don’t really come out and show themselves. They’re real cowards. So I wasn’t really that afraid.”

• At their Feb. 18 meeting, Columbia Shuswap Regional District directors approved the expenditure of up to $105,000 to resurface the asphalt of the courts used for tennis, pickleball and basketball. Replacement of chain link fencing may also be included in the project.

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