Beef recall raises awareness of food chain

Hopefully, out of all this will come a demand by meat eaters for better information about the food they eat.

The massive and unprecedented recall of beef that emerged from a Brooks, Alta.,  processing plant should cause people to pause and think about the food chain, and how demands for low consumer prices may have a long-term effect that goes far beyond this recall.

The way that meat goes from farm to the table has changed dramatically in the past 50 years. There used to be many more slaughterhouses or killing plants than there are today. There were several in B.C., including what was once called Pacific Meats and later Intercontinental Packers, in south Vancouver. There were also many small slaughterhouses.

B.C. farmers and ranchers produce a large supply of cattle for the meat market each year. But for the most part, they are now shipped off to huge feed lots on the prairies for a final fattening up before being butchered. A few farmers and ranchers raise some cattle to full size and sell meat to customers or specialty butcher shops directly. In virtually all cases, this meat is more expensive—but it comes with the assurance that the end-consumer knows just where the meat originated and how it has been handled.

Almost every large grocery retailer buys beef from a handful of huge plants, such as the Brooks facility. It has been estimated that up to 40 per cent of the beef sold in B.C. comes from that plant. That’s why the recall list is such a long one.

Grocery chains today have to offer low prices to get customers in the door, and meat prices are among the most closely-watched.

A push for low prices and efficiencies isn’t a bad thing, but it should never be at the expense of good health.

Hopefully, out of all this will come a demand by meat eaters for better information about the food they eat.

-Kelowna Capital News

 

Just Posted

Okanagan Air Cadet challenges cadet program on gendered policy

He wants the policy to be more gender inclusive

In photos: Uptown Askew’s Family Day

The Uptown Askew’s Family Day event was filled with classic cars, face… Continue reading

CSRD to support cannabis growth in agricultural zones

Regional district revision brings policy in line with Agricultural Land Commission

Word on the street: Has the wet July weather put a damper on your summer any?

Due to the wetter-than-usual July weather, the Observer asked: Has the wet… Continue reading

Okanagan-Shuswap weather: Showers to start weekend, sun returning soon

Environment Canada forecasts rain on Saturday and the heat returning next week

July showers wash out half of the Okanagan’s cherry crop

Cherry growers say this is the worst season they’ve seen in decades

B.C. VIEWS: NDP pushes ahead with Crown forest redistribution

This isn’t the time for a radical Indigenous rights agenda

Two dead in two-vehicle crash between Revelstoke and Golden

RCMP are investigating the cause of the crash

Ottawa fights planned class action against RCMP for bullying, intimidation

The current case is more general, applying to employees, including men, who worked for the RCMP

Alberta judge denies B.C.’s bid to block ‘Turn Off the Taps’ bill

He said the proper venue for the disagreement is Federal Court

Hespeler had connection to Mennonite migration

Home in Summerland was built in 1907, moved when the highway was changed

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

Most Read