Serena Caner, registered dietician

Column: Proper recipe substitutions can be a tricky business

Healthy Bites/Serena Caner

It started with a phone call. “Serena, I made a total blast-off.” Being my sister’s food consultant, I was worried. “Oh no, what happened?”

“Well, I was having a group of friends over for brunch so I baked my chorizo egg casserole…”

“And?”

“Well, one of the girls was vegetarian, so I substituted tofu for the chorizo…”

Related: The cost of healthy food rises – again

There was no need to say more. My sister is a brilliant and successful lawyer, but the kitchen continues to elude her. In her defence, making recipe substitutions is tricky and requires that you know what purpose the ingredient serves in the recipe. Unfortunately, chorizo and tofu have different water contents and flavour properties, and are not interchangeable. However, some substitutions can be made:

Yogurt for mayo: In salad dressings, plain yogurt can be used instead of mayo. However, in cooked products, using yogurt, which has a higher water content, will affect the end product (it will be more watery).

Dairy-free milk for regular milk: dairy-free milks can be substituted for regular milk, but they will taste different. Rice milk has the most neutral taste in baking. The fat content of the milk will also affect texture.

Baking powder: If you have run out of baking powder, you can mix together 1/4 tsp baking soda + 1/2 tsp cream of tartar for 1 each teaspoon baking powder. (Note: if you run out of baking soda, you cannot replace it with baking powder).

Buttermilk: A substitute for buttermilk is to add 1 tbsp (15 ml) lemon juice or vinegar to 1 cup (250 ml) milk and let it stand 5 minutes. You can also thin plain yogurt or sour cream with milk or water.

Related: Column: When you eat togetherm you eat better

Unsweetened chocolate: 1 oz unsweetened chocolate can be substituted with 3 tbsp cocoa powder mixed with 1 tbsp butter or oil.

Icing sugar: icing sugar can be made by blending 1 cup white sugar with 1 tbsp cornstarch in your food processor or coffee grinder, until finely powdered.

Cornstarch (for thickening sauce): 1 tbsp cornstarch can be substituted with 2 tbsp flour, but flour should be cooked longer, to avoid a raw taste.

– Serena Caner is a registered dietitian at Shuswap Lake General Hospital


@SalmonArm
newsroom@saobserver.net

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Shuswap rock climbing gym opening Spring Break

Salmon Arm’s Gym of Rock to accommodate all ages and abilities

Penticton woman captures footage of bobcat feasting on bird in backyard

‘Kim Ken Oszinski’ posted photos and videos of the bobcat from just a few feet away

Okanagan Shuswap weather: Glimpses of sun expected on another wintry day

The sun will be peeking out from behind the clouds for the next few days

Larch Hills junior racers top Teck BC Midget Championships

Multiple top-five finishes contribute to aggregate team trophy

Pool plans disappoint Shuswap swim clubs

Mayor assures options for city rec centre only preliminary

70% of Canadians agree with mandatory vaccines for children: poll

The debate for pro and anti vaccinations has heated up after a measles outbreak in Vancouver

UPDATE: Woman, off-duty cop in critical condition after stabbing outside B.C. elementary school

The officer was interceding in an alleged assault when he and the woman were stabbed

Jr. Golds take third in Valley Championships

Salmon Arm team moves to provincials after a near-undefeated regular season

‘A little baloney’ in PM’s claim about solicitor-client privilege on SNC-Lavalin

The Conservatives and NDP want Trudeau to waive that privilege so Wilson-Raybould can offer her side of the story

Proposed edible pot rules are wasteful, would leave products tasteless: critics

When Canada legalized weed last fall, it only allowed fresh or dried bud, oil, plants and seeds

Samsung folding phone is different – but also almost $2,000

But most analysts see a limited market for foldable-screen phones

Alcohol policies fizzle for Canadian governments as harms overflow: reports

About 80 per cent of Canadians drink, and most enjoy a drink or two

Most Read