Policy front and centre in election

Right now, we’re actually pleased that, at the very least, there are issues on the table.

Turn on your TV and change it to a news channel, open a paper, or check the internet. It’s a policy blizzard out there.

In fact, we’d have trouble keeping up if we were covering nothing but announcements from the three major political parties. While the United States is suffering through a bizarre Republican primary that is light on issues and heavy on Trump, Canada is a policy wonk’s dream.

Just in the past week or so, we’ve seen the major party leaders make promises on senate reform, old age security, northern defence, business taxes, even home renovation tax credits.

You could criticize some of these announcements. Many of them are on the small scale side of things.

We’ve called for a debate on big issues – things like global warming, but we could as easily have said health care or the role of Canada’s military, post-secondary education, veterans and the future of our economy.

So far, we haven’t seen too much discussion of those big issues. But the party leaders have a long road ahead of them, and they have to save some ammunition for September and October, when everyone’s back from summer getaways and can really get down to paying attention to the news again.

Right now, we’re actually pleased that, at the very least, there are issues on the table. Not all of these issues are minor, either – when Harper talks about expanding the Junior Canadian Rangers, or Mulcair wants to return Old Age Security to 65 from 67 years, those are both indications of significant priorities for their potential governments.

We’re in the middle of a long, long campaign. The leaders could have been excused for stretching things out, going to rallies, and not saying much.

Instead, we’ve actually seen a lot of talk about how things would go under Trudeau, Harper and Mulcair. It may be a little piecemeal right now, but it could be worse.

We could be talking about Donald Trump.

–Penticton Western News

 

Just Posted

Salmon Arm’s fire risk worries professionals

Using the 1998 wildfire as an example, consultant suggests more prevention work needed.

Adams Lake band to get new chief

Incumbent chief Paul Michel will not be seeking re-election

Updated: Accused in Kelowna triple murder in court today

Jacob Forman has been in custody since he was arrested and charged with second degree murder

UPDATE: Head on collision closes Trans-Canada west of Revelstoke

Two tractor-trailers collided on Highway 1 forcing the closure of the road, no detour is available

JoeAnna’s House fundraising campaign reaches $4.5 million

Offering ‘home away from home’ for families of KGH patients

VSS drama students to hit the stage

VSS students prepare to stage a midwinter’s night production

Carpet bowlers have been excluded from BC 55+ Games and Canada 55+ Games

Gold medal carpet bowling winners not able to defend their titles in 2018

Police to provide update on unsolved 13-year-old B.C. girl’s murder

IHIT say no one has been arrested or charged in connection with Marrisa Shen’s death

Rural B.C. students score visit with Canadiens netminder Carey Price

Two students from the Caiboo Chilcotin can hardly wait to meet hometown hero Carey Price in Montreal.

Business Spotlight: Mayor to give state of the city address

Mayor Nancy Cooper will be the guest speaker at the January Salmon… Continue reading

Unplug and play in the South Shuswap

The Unplug and Play Family Literacy Week kicks off on Jan. 20… Continue reading

Column: Price fixing means a payout for consumers

Are you going to redeem your $25 Loblaws Gift card? With all… Continue reading

VIDEO: Elk parade on Vancouver Island is awesome sight

They’re out in force for a morning stroll. Check out some of Youbou’s famous elk.

North Delta’s Colton Hasebe named BC Children’s Hospital Foundation’s 2018 Champion Child

Colton takes the reins from 2107 Champion Child and Tsawwassen resident Taylin McGill

Most Read