Technology comes up short against flooding

I had presumed that monitoring the flow of mountain streams would be standard practice, particularly during the unusual weather patterns…

In 2012 we have every imaginable device available in modern technology.

At times it appears almost as though day to day living functions on remote control. Computers have become almost indispensable tools of information, from research into family roots to providing almost minute by minute weather reports.

Space travel has become a reality much in the mode of Buck Rogers of the 21st Century comic strip so popular decades ago. It seems nothing is impossible now. Although at considerable cost, airplanes and helicopters are used for multiple purposes, even the somewhat superficial task of monitoring traffic volume in urban areas.

I had presumed that monitoring the flow of mountain streams would be standard practice, particularly during the unusual weather patterns we have experienced this year. Surely with today’s easier access to upper regions it could be determined when something unusual is happening to the flow of mountain streams.

In the late 1960s,  just prior to the fatal washout at Camp Creek on the west end of Griffin Lake (Trans-Canada Highway), it had been noted that during a normal high runoff, the creek had dwindled down to a mere trickle. It would be interesting to know whether similar indications were evident during all the recent disasters.

In the late 1920-1930s, it was understandable that people were caught without warning in landslides and washouts. By today’s standards that is classed as a primitive era.

Did someone turn the clock back or is there some computer illiterate reason why everyone was caught flat-footed in 2012?

Alli M. Graham

 

 

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