Understanding the nature of rain and its impact on the garden

It’s really important to protect a garden with a good mulch or living ground cover.

In order to see a rainbow, you have to stand a little rain.

That’s true, but if you’ve lost tourist or business dollars, got flooded out, or had to cancel a special outdoor event, rain can be an element of nature we don’t always want or appreciate.

I grew up near Grouse Mountain in Vancouver, where it could rain for weeks on end, but my mom would always say that if it wasn’t for the rain, we’d be living in a desert where nothing would grow, so be thankful for it. But with the rains we’ve been having lately, I don’t see anybody out there singing in it.

We have so many ways of describing rainfall: precipitation, the heavens have opened up, pounding, punishing, driving, torrential, pelting, a downpour, a cloudburst, raining buckets or cats and dogs, a deluge, a West-Coaster and a soaker rain. Then there are showers, intermittent rains, sprinkling, spitting, drizzling and  misty rain. We also have a couple of descriptive expressions for the wet stuff, but they so far remain unprintable. When it’s pouring rain, we grumble under our breaths and mutter that it’s crappy out and only good weather for ducks!  But such is the nature of rain.

Rain can truly wreak havoc on our landscapes. It can come down like a million watery missiles, hitting the ground at speeds of up to 25 mph – thwack!  The impact can create big craters on an unprotected soil surface and the precious topsoil can be washed away, especially if your garden is on a slope. The life forms and plants can easily be damaged or killed, so it’s really important to protect all of this with a good mulch or living ground cover.

Last year I mulched my gardens with solid shredded leaves, which turned out not to be the greatest, because the water couldn’t always penetrate through it.  This year, I took the time to make a great mulch cover, which consisted of half, partially composted wood chips, to allow the air and water through, a quarter shredded leaves from last fall, and the rest fresh grass clippings. (My cement mixer is good for this job, or also in the large bucket of the power wagon). This will provide a great balance of carbon and nitrogen, and it’s  rich and healthy looking.

Someone sent me a link on a fellow in Oregon who has started a garden movement called Back to Eden (Google the video).  He has a very poor source of water for his giant garden and fruit trees, but he uses a good mulch cover every year, and he never has to water – ever. There was a gal in my Gaia class that was taking this big course because she and her husband had just bought a property in town that was chock-a-block full of gardens, but the previous owner’s water bills were a couple of thousand dollars a year and she wanted to learn better ways of maintaining, growing and watering them in order to reduce the bills. She was elated and relieved to learn that the solution was to simply cover her gardens with a healthy organic mulch, which would then trap the moisture, protect her soil surface, reduce the weeds, build up the underlying soil, provide good slow-release nutrients and provide food for her worms and microbes.

The rain can be a pain, but the silver lining is that it’s chlorine free and our nifty new smart meters aren’t counting the energy it’s costing you to use the water pump. After the showers, the beautiful rainbows appear and the scent of the earth gives us an amazing olfactory blast.  The robins start singing, the misty clouds rise and disappear into blue skies, tiny crystal orbs form on the leaves and centres of flowers and the birds begin splashing and bathing in the clean, new puddles.  But best of all, we don’t have to spend a bunch of time watering.

Rain rarely stops me from going out and working in the yard because I just protect myself from it with a good waterproof cover.  The same goes for our gardens.  Just protect it, so you don’t have to sweat it.

 

Just Posted

Stolen vehicle evades attempt to spike tires near Sicamous

RCMP are looking for a black late 1990s Ford pickup with a suspension lift and no licence plates

CP vote deadline rescheduled for Friday

The deadline for the Teamsters Canada Rail Conference and International Brotherhood of… Continue reading

Shuswap Lake just keeps rising

Regional district officials encourage those with vulnerable properties to prepare early.

Tourism Kelowna adopts sustainability initiative

Responsible to environment key to long-term tourism growth

Herons build new colony near Fifth Street

Duplex developers will follow guidelines to protect birds nesting

Police release video on how to ‘run, hide, fight’ if there’s an active shooter

Vancouver police offer video with input from E-Comm, BC EHS, Vancouver Fire and Rescue

Size, cost set for proposed Vernon cultural facility

Size of new home for museum and art gallery is about 58,000 square feet; cost is $40 million

SilverStar reaches new heights with gondola

Vernon ski resort installing new feature, with opening date set for July 7

Salmon Arm falls to Vernon in womens masters division Soccer

A close game ends 3-2 in favor of Vernon

VIDEO: Campers leave big mess at rural Vancouver Island campsite

Vehicle parts, garbage, a mattress, lawn chairs, beer cans, and even fecal matter left in the area

Crashes, intoxication and thefts keep Chase RCMP busy

May long weekend sees police deal with threats, drunkeness and vehicle break-ins.

Highlights from a week of Shuswap soccer

League play in full swing over the long weekend

30 C in B.C., 30 cm of snow expected for eastern Canada

It might be hot in B.C., but the rest of Canada still dealing with cold

Horgan defends fight to both retain and restrict Alberta oil imports

Alberta says pipeline bottlenecks are kneecapping the industry, costing millions of dollars a day

Most Read