A mix of steel panels will go in the centre of a roundabout to be constructed at the Highway 97A/Main Street intersection.

District budgets $300,000 for highway roundabout design

Mayor hopeful half or all of cost will be found from outside sources, not costing taxpayers.

Sicamous council has budgeted $300,000 for a sculptural concept to adorn the future roundabout on Highway 97A.

The concept was presented at last week’s council meeting. Designed by McElhanney Consulting Services, and funded by the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure) the proposed roundabout sculpture includes a layered mix of rounded horizontal and vertical panels, animated by lighting. A report from McElhanney notes foreground panels can be used to display artworks, etc., and be replaced seasonally, or when special events are being promoted.

Four variations of the concept were presented to council, varying with the materials proposed for use. Construction costs for each range between $305,000 and $410,000 (plus GST and 20 to 30 per cent contingency). Council chose the least expensive, which includes panels of corten- and brushed-stainless steel.

About half of the budgeted cost is slated to come from general revenue, while Mayor Terry Rysz is hopeful the remainder (if not all) will be funded through grant money or other opportunities.

“Even though we’ve got it in the budget, the resources could come through possibly a grant or an association or regional district,” said Rysz. “I’m not expecting it to cost the taxpayer of Sicamous the full $300,000.”

Rysz said there’s opportunity for council to seek input from the Columbia Shuswap Regional District, the Splatsin and other stakeholders so they too might be represented in the final design.

Earlier this year, the ministry announced it would be investing about $7 million into the construction of a roundabout at the 97A/Main Street intersection to improve traffic flow, as well as driver and pedestrian safety. The steel panels proposed for the roundabout will be arranged in such a way as to block sightlines, keeping drivers focused on the road ahead.

“That’s how the roundabouts work. You’re only supposed to look left, not anywhere else,” ministry project manager Rampaul Dulay explained at an open house. “That’s why you always see some kind of feature in the middle of the roundabout.”

 

 

Just Posted

Salmon Arm makeup artist adds new sparkle to industry

Missy MacKintosh launches her own cosmetics company with the release of biodegradable glitter

Blind Bay shooter changes story about accomplice

Jordan Barnes tells the court he was sole person responsible for death of Nicholas Larsen

Okanagan realtors add voices to anti-speculation tax coalition

This speculation tax is likely to harm the very people the government is trying to protect

Askew’s owner objects to underpass

Downtown Salmon Arm voices its support for project, which will go to referendum in October

MMIW drone team fundraising for summer searches

Organizers expect the searches to expand this summer

Toronto van attack suspect faces 10 counts of first-degree murder

The suspect in the Toronto van attack that killed 10 people and injured 15 others on Monday is a 25-year-old man named Alek Minassian

‘Enough is enough’: G7 ministers agree to call Russia out

‘Enough is enough’: G7 ministers agree to call Russia out on ‘malign’ behaviour

Cosby jury to decide: Serial rapist or con artist’s mark

Bill Cosby is at the courthouse Tuesday morning ahead of closing arguments in his sexual assault retrial.

Trump: ‘Our hearts are with the grieving families in Canada’

U.S. President Donald Trump is offering his condolences to Canadians

Trudeau calls van attack ‘horrific and senseless’

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau calls van attack ‘horrific and senseless,’ says no apparent terror link

Officer’s actions ‘one shining moment’ after Toronto van attack

Arresting officer’s actions ‘one shining moment’ in the wake of Toronto van attack

Painting of Enderby landmark finds home in Victoria

Royal BC Museum adds, from Grafton Tyler Brown collection, work of Enderby Cliffs

Judith Guichon steps down as Lieutenant Governor of B.C.

Election decision didn’t make her best moments from the past six years

Okanagan Lake levels stay steady but snowpack is growing: officials

Whether or not the tributaries and creeks flood depends on how suddenly the snowpack begins to melt,

Most Read