Muddy race a clear winner among participants

About 40 people took the challenge Saturday in the first Mayhem in the Muddy Maize.

Leslie Stewart makes her way through a chilly pond during the Mayhem in the Muddy Maize race.

It was a day for mud – much mud – lots of sweat and possibly the odd tear. Followed by smiles. Many smiles.

About 40 people took the challenge Saturday in the first Mayhem in the Muddy Maize, a 10-kilometre obstacle-course mud race that started and ended in DeMille’s corn maze in Salmon Arm.

For Leslie Stewart of Sicamous, it was her 51st birthday, a muddy celebration she shared with her 18-year-old son Alexander.

“He said, ‘Mother, this is crazy. I’m supposed to get you flowers and perfume, not drag you through the mud.”

Nonetheless, they both enjoyed the race, says Leslie, noting they were able to help each other when needed, each with their different strengths and weaknesses.

Because Alexander had been in cadets he could give her pointers on navigating the three mud pits with barbed wire strung across the top.

“Keeping really low, pulling with your arms and don’t put your bum up,” she says.

As a runner, she could encourage him during the run portions, bparticularly when he was having trouble with stitches in his side.

The duo completed the race in about two hours and 20 minutes.

Organizer Ray Warner of Cool Running explains that, along with the three mud pits, there were fences to climb through, a pond and creek to navigate, the corn fields and trails to run through, bales of hay to get over and mountains of gravel in Blackburns’ gravel pit to climb. He received lots of good comments and there was just one injury, a head scratched by barbed wire.

“It was fun, everybody had a great time, lots of good reviews.”

For Leslie Stewart, one “huge, huge hill” was tough.

“I was pretty much on my hands and knees – he kept encouraging me,” she says of her son.

Then there were the hay bales.

“When they said we’d have to go over bales of hay, I was picturing the little ones. But they were those great big ones we call the giant marshmallows when they’re out in the fields.”

The water obstacles were cold, but the Stewarts both found them refreshing.

“I swim, he scuba dives.”

Overall, both said they would do the race again.

“It was tougher than I thought, but it was a good challenge,” Leslie concludes.

For the inaugural race, Warner advertised it only three weeks ahead of time because he didn’t want to get too many entries.

Of the 40 participants, there were four or five people who did it as individuals and the rest were on teams, which could range from two to eight people. The rule is, all members of a team must finish together, which encourages team-building.

Although awards were not given out for placings this year, Warner noted that Salmon Arm’s Gregg Patterson came in first. He completed the course in one hour, 32 minutes and 33 seconds.

Patterson decided to do the race after participating in the Spartan race at Sun Peaks the weekend prior, an obstacle race up the mountain that several Salmon Arm residents also tested themselves on.

As for Muddy Mayhem, Patterson enjoyed it.

“It was fun, the gravel pit was challenging, running up the sides of the gravel pit. And the barbed wire tagged me a couple of times,” he said, adding that his favourite segments were the gravel pit, the pond and the mud crawl.

 

“That was all good.”

 

 

Just Posted

Silver Creek RCMP search expands north

RCMP were seen collecting evidence three kilometres north of the farm where human remains were found

Family worries about missing Malakwa woman

Discovery of human remains has put family members on edge

A Monday wrap

Read the unfolding story of the discovery of human remains on a Silver Creek farm

Update: Police expand search in North Okanagan-Shuswap

Examination continues in Silver Creek, while another search happens between Salmon Arm and Enderby

Who is Curtis Sagmoen?

The Observer reveals what we know about the man attached to the Silver Creek property where human remains were found

Rally condemns violence, promotes healing

Discovery of human remains and disappearances of women have created tension in the rural community

B.C. NDP convention set for Victoria

Premier, federal leader Jagmeet Singh to add energy

B.C. school trustee calls LGBTQ school program ‘weapon of propaganda’

Chilliwack’s Barry Neufeld published the comments on his Facebook page

B.C. couple hope boat drone becomes first to cross Atlantic

Colin and Julie Angus of Victoria to have drone collect environmental data en route

B.C. casino accused of illegal activity follows rules: operator

B.C. had launched review after concerns about money laundering at River Rock casino in Richmond

Opponents of LGBTQ program to file human rights complaint against Surrey School District

District denied Parents United Canada right to rent Bell Performing Arts Centre for rally next month

Young actors give credence to play about youthful love

Students play integral roles in Shuswap Theatre’s Romeo and Juliet

Ex-employee describes alleged sexual assault by B.C. city councillor

Complainant was a teen during the alleged 1992 incident

Most Read